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IEEE International Workshop Metrology for AeroSpace Time's Up

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 SPECIAL SESSION 

 Relativistic Metrology

 

PROGRAM

 

Thursday, June 23, 2016

10:00 - 12:00
SS8 (Part 1): Special Session on Relativistic Metrology
Chairs: Roberto Peron, Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, Italy
        Enrico Lorenzini, University of Padova, Italy
Room: Room 7, University of Florence, Via G. Capponi 9

 

10:00    Casimir forces in relativistic metrology: Fundamental physical tests and aerospace applications
        Fabrizio Pinto, Jazan University, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

10:30    The Advanced Virgo interferometer
        Fiodor Sorrentino, INFN, Italy

10:50    Accurate Switching Currents Measurements in Quantum Washboard Potential
        Vincenzo Pierro, University of Sannio, Italy
        Giovanni Filatrella, University of Sannio, Italy

11:00    Laboratory tests of a high-precision laser interferometry read-out for the GG experiment in space
        Marco Pisani, National Institute of Metrological Research, Italy
        Massimo Zucco, National Institute of Metrological Research, Italy
        Anna M. Nobili, University of Pisa, INFN, Italy

11:20    External Metrology System for the Stabilization of Large Ring-Lasers
        Alberto Donazzan, University of Padova, INFN Padova, Italy
        Giampiero Naletto, University of Padova, INFN Padova, CNR-IFN Padova, Italy
        Maria Guglielmina Pelizzo, INFN Padova, CNR-IFN Padova, Italy
        Davide Cuccato, University of Padova, INFN Padova, Italy
        Alessandro Beghi, University of Padova, INFN Padova, Italy
        Antonello Ortolan, INFN - Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Italy
        Jacopo Belfi, INFN Pisa, Italy
        Filippo Bosi, INFN Pisa, Italy
        Angela Di Virgilio, INFN Pisa, Italy
        Nicolò Beverini, University of Pisa, Italy
        Giorgio Carelli, University of Pisa, Italy
        Enrico Maccioni, University of Pisa, Italy
        Rosa Santagata, Paris 13 University, France
        Andreino Simonelli, Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Germany, INFN     Pisa, Italy
        Alberto Porzio, CNR-SPIN, INFN Napoli, Italy
        Angelo Tartaglia, Politecnico di Torino, Italy

 

Thursday, June 23, 2016

14:30 - 16:10
SS8 (Part 2): Special Session on Relativistic Metrology
Chairs: Roberto Peron, Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, Italy
        Enrico Lorenzini, University of Padova, Italy
Room: Room 7, University of Florence, Via G. Capponi 9

 

14:30    LARES Satellite Thermal Forces and a Test of General Relativity
        Richard Matzner, University of Texas at Austin, USA
        Phuc Nguyen, University of Texas at Austin, USA
        Jason Brooks, University of Texas at Austin, USA
        Ignazio Ciufolini, University of Salento, Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche, Italy
        Antonio Paolozzi, Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche, 'Sapienza' University of Rome, Italy
        Erricos C. Pavlis, University of Maryland, USA
        Rolf Koenig, GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, Germany
        John Ries, University of Texas at Austin, USA
        Vahe Gurzadyan, Alikhanian National Laboratory and Yerevan State University, Armenia
        Roger Penrose, University of Oxford, United Kingdom
        Giampiero Sindoni, 'Sapienza' University of Rome, Italy
        Claudio Paris, Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche, 'Sapienza' University of Rome, Italy
        Harutyun Khachatryan, Alikhanian National Laboratory and Yerevan State University, Armenia
        Sergey Mirzoyan, Alikhanian National Laboratory and Yerevan State University, Armenia

14:50    Measurements of General Relativity precessions in the field of the Earth with laser-ranged satellites and the LARASE program
        David M. Lucchesi, Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, Italy
        Carmelo Magnafico, Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, Italy
        Roberto Peron, Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, Italy
        Massimo Visco, Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, Italy
        Luciano Anselmo, ISTI-CNR, Italy
        Carmen Pardini, ISTI-CNR, Italy
        Massimo Bassan, University of Rome 'Tor Vergata', INFN, Italy
        Giuseppe Pucacco, University of Rome 'Tor Vergata', INFN, Italy

15:10    High-Accuracy Gravity Acceleration Measurements at the Moon from the GRAIL Mission
        David Edmund Smith, MIT, USA
        Maria T. Zuber, MIT, USA

15:30    Sensitivity study of systematic errors in the BepiColombo relativity experiment
        Giulia Schettino, University of Pisa, Italy
        Luigi Imperi, 'Sapienza' University of Rome, Italy
        Luciano Iess, 'Sapienza' University of Rome, Italy
        Giacomo Tommei, University of Pisa, Italy
        
15:50    The BepiColombo ISA accelerometer: ready for launch
        Roberto Peron, Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, Italy
        Valerio Iafolla, Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, Italy
        Emiliano Fiorenza, Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, Italy
        Carlo Lefevre, Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, Italy
        David M. Lucchesi, Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, Italy
        Marco Lucente, Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, Italy
        Carmelo Magnafico, Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, Italy
        Francesco Santoli, Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, Italy

 


 

CHAIR

  • Roberto Peron, Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, Italy;
  • Enrico Lorenzini, University of Padova, Italy.

 

ABSTRACT

Among the quantities whose measurement metrology is involved in, length and time surely play an important role. Indeed, since more than a century their status and role drastically changed: Einstein major theories of special and general relativity implied a deep rethinking, which can be roughly summarized by introducing a 'new' entity, the 'spacetime' (new geometry: special relativity), which is curved and dynamic (general relativity). The consequences associated to this change are important, and still today they cannot be said to be totally unfolded. This is especially true on the experimental side: testable consequences of relativity are usually small at the scales accessible by direct (i.e., non astrophysical or cosmological) investigation. Yet considerable progress has come from several directions, and today some of these consequences are gradually entering the accessible domain, not to say everyday life: the Global Positioning System (GPS) and more in general Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS), to be fully exploited, require careful consideration of at least the biggest among these tiny effects.

We are therefore assisting to what can be termed as "Relativistic metrology": the precise measurement of quantities related to spacetime dynamics and, therefore, to gravitational dynamics. Precision means knowledge of possible tiny disturbing effects, and this along the years spurred many research and many technological advances. The session will concentrate on the various basic quantities to be precisely measured, along with the related scientific and technological issues. The focus, whenever possible, will be however placed on fundamental aspects.

 

TOPICS

Among the various topics expected to be covered in this session, we can point out:

  • Measurement of time (and frequency);
  • Measurement of length;
  • Geodesy;
  • Navigation;
  • Astronomy and astrometry;
  • Fundamental Physics tests in space.

The expected range of topics and disciplines is therefore rather wide; it goes from basic measurement techniques (such as length and time) to their various applications. Abstracts are welcome on these subjects as well as on related ones.

 

 Invited Talk

Casimir forces in relativistic metrology: Fundamental physical tests and aerospace applications

 

ABSTRACT

The subject of dispersion forces has been characterized by a history of fascinating, multi-disciplinary, and unpredictable developments. Atoms were introduced into Western thought in the 5th century BC as philosophical devices to explain the existence of everything we experience in the universe. It is less appreciated, however, that the atomic hypothesis only operates if a means is provided to form macroscopic objects as ensembles of interconnected atoms. Hence atomistic philosophers speculated early on about possible mechanisms for atoms to 'hook up' to one another. The details remained a mystery for over two millennia as Newton explicitly admits in the Preface to the Principia. Two major modern physical theories were required: electrodynamics and quantum mechanics. After Maxwell and the discovery of the electron, even as the atomic hypothesis was still facing opposition, atoms could for the first time be viewed as electromagnetic wave radiators, thus leading Lebedev to posit the existence of mutual 'ponderomotive forces.' Over three decades later, quantum mechanics was employed by Wang, and later London - who introduced the term 'dispersion forces' - to pursue calculation of the force between two hydrogen atoms by modeling them as interacting harmonic oscillators. Once the mechanism was fully understood through the work of Casimir and the generalization by Lifshitz, the modern interface of dispersion force science and nanotechnology became possible. One of the most exciting developments has been the transformation from the passive description by Feynman of van der Waals forces as "a man with his hands full of molasses" to an active one in which such interactions are no longer merely the cause of a failure mode - stiction - but are appreciated as a unique technological opportunity. This development finds its roots in the Lifshitz theory and in early experimental work on van der Waals forces in irradiated semiconductors, which showed that dispersion forces can be modulated in time. Additionally, the computation of dispersion forces in non-trivial geometries clarified that their dependence on topology is not explainable by simple pairwise additivity thus opening the way to Casimir force manipulation. Finally, the role of the medium separating two interacting surfaces has been clarified leading to demonstrations of repulsive van der Waals forces. All such elements are presently converging onto nanodevice design and operation and enabling features and performance previously impossible in sensing, actuation, propulsion, and energy storage. The most recent component in the development of this explosively expanding field has been consideration of Casimir systems in curved spacetime and even in linearized quantum gravity, also aided by the electromagnetic analogy with general relativity. Therefore Casimir cavities are being considered in novel gravitational wave detectors and for tests of quantum electrodynamics in non-inertial reference frames.

 

BIOGRAPHY

DrFabrizioPinto-smsmallFabrizio Pinto obtained his Laurea cum laude from the University of Rome, "La Sapienza," in 1984 and his Ph.D from Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah, U.S.A., in 1989 with a Sigma-Xi award-winning dissertation on the theory of globular star cluster formation and the use of supercomputers in the gravitational N-body problem. He published in astrophysics, quantum physics, general relativity, pedagogy, and science popularization, and he received awards from the Gravity Research Foundation and the Griffith Observatory of Los Angeles. In 1996, Dr. Pinto joined the Navigation and Flight Mechanics section of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory at Caltech in Pasadena, California. There he carried out pre-launch research in support of the Stardust and Deep Space 1 missions to comets Wild 2 and Borrelly, respectively, and he was the orbit determination specialist during the Galileo orbiter E19 Europa flyby in 1999. He was a member of the JPL Interstellar Program and contributed to defining the core technologies necessary for future robotic missions to extrasolar planetary systems. In 1999, Dr Pinto left JPL to lead the first startup company in the world entirely devoted to the development of novel, market disruptive products made possible by the manipulation of Casimir forces. As a California physicist-entrepreneur, he obtained ten US patents, some of which have also issued in the EU and Japan, representing the largest existing portfolio of intellectual property in dispersion force-engineering. In 2013, Dr. Pinto relocated his R&D effort from California to Jazan University and is now at the Laboratory for Quantum Vacuum Applications, which he founded and codirects with Ali Al-Kamli. Dr. Pinto has been invited to lecture on different aspects of dispersion force engineering at such venues as the Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, the Foundation for the Future, the International Space Development Conference, the Euro Asia Economic Forum, the Saudi International Meeting on Frontiers of Physics, and KAUST. Last year, as a Keynote Speaker, he spoke on the role of dispersion force engineering in aerospace at the first International Symposium on Sustainable Aviation held in Istanbul; he also presented papers on dispersion forces in curved spacetime, including novel strategies for gravitational wave detection, at the historic 14th Marcel Grossmann Meeting in Rome and at the conference on Topics in Astroparticle and Underground Physics (TAUP 2015) in Turin.